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Wednesday Child Master Newsletter

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Wednesday Child Master Newsletter



Foster Care vs. Adoption:
Things to Consider

When making the decision to become a foster family, there are a few things to consider.




Fostering

  • Are you able to complete the application, background check, and supply the necessary information to licensing?
  • Are you able to complete the necessary pre-service training hours?
  • Do you have space in your home and vehicles to comfortably handle one or more children?
  • Have you discussed with your family the age range of children you are willing to take and explored what that might look like?
  • Do you have any knowledge or education on what childhood trauma, attachment loss, grief, and/or the drug and alcohol affects look like in terms of behaviors in children and teens?
  • Are you and those that live with you all on board to be a foster family? Is anyone resistant to the idea?
  • Have you discussed your plans with extended family and close friends and considered their views?
  • Can you agree with a non-corporal discipline policy?
  • Are your immediate family relationships in a place to handle the stress that a lot of needs can bring?
  • Are your finances in a place to handle the potential financial burden that children with high needs can bring, apart from any reimbursement?

Adopting:

  • When considering adoption through the foster care system, it is important to ask yourself the above questions AND are you prepared to make a life-long commitment to a child that may have ongoing struggles?
  • Are you prepared to make a life-long connection with a family that you may not completely agree with?
  • Are you prepared to handle ongoing grief as new developmental milestones bring up old hurts and feelings in your children?
  • Have you considered that adoption is not only a cause for celebration, but also a recognition of the huge loss that has occurred in a child's life?
  • Are you prepared to have your heart break in a million pieces at times, and then just as easily have it burst with pride for your child?



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hero n. - a person noted for courageous acts or nobility of character

It's the hand that holds a scared child or the arms that embrace a resistant teen. It's the heart that stands up in the face of hurtful words or deeds and it's the body that sinks into the chair at night, exhausted from the emotional upheavals of the day. It's the weary, yet determined soul making room in their home for children in need, and room in their heart for hurting parents. It's the passionate person completely energized by making a difference. A hero isn't some distant celebrity or fairytale. No, that courageous, noble, determined, energized hero is YOU.




Waiting Kids Needs

The children represented by Idaho Wednesday's Child have very specific needs. Because of the nature of being in foster care, awaiting adoption, and all that has brought them to this point, our children need families who are caring, nurturing, and flexible. Patience is certainly a virtue when it comes to adopting from foster care! Having knowledge of the impact of trauma on children and their brain is extremely important. These children need strong and determined families who can access community resources, advocate when necessary, and won't give up when the going gets tough. Finally, our kids need parents who not only go the extra mile, but celebrate every step and accomplishment along the way!

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